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in georgia yes two bills with religion our liberty in their titles and were seen as a way to possibly discriminate against gay men and lesbian, go down in that. also in another conservative state. we are seeing a tidal wave on this issue that i think will be hard for people to resist in just about any corner of it. >> yeah, you put it that way. that's extraordinary, coming from how long you've been covering these state and national issues. jackie, when you look at the legal issues here which as we've said we're -- which combined with the political legislature, and then something else, jackie, which is the fact that these issues are being covered differently, i think, and not covered always on the sometimes conservative terms of calling it religious liberty. a lot of people support religious liberty, but they don't think that means it should be a cover for discrimination. >> well, yeah, i think one of the things that's been interesting, particularly with the republican party is the strain of libertarianism that's been infused recently, which is another reason why i think you see some r
because of their religion so she didn't think the bill made accepts. your organization release add statement today that read "this legislation would give homosexuals more protection than they did under the current law". given nobody could come up with example of the discrimination, how could they have more protection under a law essentially created to allow people who didn't want to serve gays getting married with things like photography or wedding cakes? >> well, the irony is that arizona does not currently have sexual orientation listed as a protected category in either their employment nondiscrimination laws or public accommodation laws. so the current state of the law in arizona is that anybody can discriminate against gays at any time for any reason or for no reason whatsoever. this bill deals only with when a government action conflicts with a person's sincerely held religious belief. it requires the person asserting that right to be able to prove that this is motivated by the religious belief, that that belief is sincerely held, and that the government action is a substantia
under state law in arizona. race, gender and religion are but being gay is not. it wasn't protected before brewer vetoed the bill and it still isn't protected after the veto. the waiting photographer refused to fake pick kpurs of the gay couple and she was sued for it. the bill she vetoed was an effort to protect against the legal challenges that could result from discrimination. even with this bill gone there is no law on arizona's books that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation. at least 12 states this year has issued legislation like arizona to extend the tide. senator mike lee of utah, conservative republican has introduced the marriage and religious freedom act. as they scramble topaz these laws, though, the courts seem to be moving in the opposite direction, even when it comes to red state america. just this week a federal judge ordered officials in the state of kentucky to start recognizing the marriage of same-sex couples that were performed outside of the state. and in texas, federal judge struck down that state's ban on same-sex marriage ruling that the cur
religion has the most force. the courts are like the worst place in order to try to get a religious belief codified or encoded into law. because the way in which the supreme court. >> you have to have a secular purpose for the law. when religious right was on the offense, what it did was to use a ballot initiative. everyone goes into the voting booth and votes their religious convictions. you can't second guess that. now that those statutes have become to be struck down by the courts, giving us secular reasons. now that they're playing defense, what the religious right is doing is saying, let's rely on the free exercise clause in order to allow individuals to sort these claims in court. in some ways, arizona was the easiest case, she showed no evidence of religious discrimination against businesses. land of legal, gay rights organization told me today they had received almost 500 complaints over the past four years about lgbt discrimination in arizona. >> which is legal. >> it starts to feel like, you hurt my fist when i hit your face argument. but i think as we move to other states, that
the case in arizona, businesses to use religion as a defense in a private lawsuit. so to give you an example of how that might play out, you know, let's say you live in a state where it's illegal to fire someone because they're gay. now, if one of these bills passes, that company could turn around and say, oh, hey, i think homosexuality is a sin, therefore i'm going to fire you and i don't need to abide by this law. so, you know, that lawsuit provision is a big deal. >> i know in some of the cases, in some of the states where they've been considering this, the lawsuit provision works in such a way not only can you not sue somebody for discriminating against you, but if you do, you have to pay their legal fees as well as your own so it's almost a punishment for even complaining about being discriminated against. it's fascinating stuff and fast-moves story. dana liebelson, reporter for "mother jones." nice to see you. >> thanks for having me. >>> the federal prosecutor's investigation of the george washington bridge scandal in chris christie's new jersey has taken a turn today. we'v
religion, also under consideration at this point. joining me here onset to make sense of all of this is one of the big voices from the last few years of lgbt advocacy, roberta caplin argued edie windsor's case before the supreme court. i can only imagine how stressful it was. you had an entire movement riding on your shoulders. thank you for joining us and trying to make sense of the latest events. we see yesterday's news out of texas, similar rulings before that in virginia and kentucky. what do you think the future holds for those cases? what do you think the next thing to hit the supreme court might be? >> the windsor case came down at the end of june. since that decision there have been 15 court decisions in courts throughout the country in places like as you mentioned, kentucky, virginia, utah, oklahoma, all relying on windsor. i don't think that's surprising at all. windsor is about the core dignity of gay people and how they have the same type of dignity and should get the same respect as everyone else. once the supreme court has said that as i predicted back in the summer, it's all
, and they agree on this. that is sort of the old school, old time religion message. whatever societal problems you think are holding you back, it's not an excuse for you to is a advance. it really irritates a lot of young black men who say you're blaming the victim and you're saying you're putting all the burden on them to ignore all of these social ills that are real and not dealing with the social ills themselves. it's something that the president's critics don't like. but the interesting thing about president obama is that he knows that. he is actively engaging those critics. and he is pushing back. and he really wants them to agree with him that this is the right message to send to young black men. and you get the sense that this is a president who doesn't want to leave office not having given this message to young men, not having been a physical, living example of what he wants them to aspire to. he is a this aspirational politics is his core. that's his kansas grandmother talking to him. his upbringing with by his grandparents is what you hear. and he really does believe it. >> let's listen
, what they want to do. either as an individual or a nation. the monotheistic religions of the world all push its members to fight against poverty. but right now the united states of america, the rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting what the rich don't take with them. >> congressman emanuel cleaver and sister simone campbell, i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thank you, reverend. >> good to be here. >>> still ahead, a top democrat calls out republicans for their dependence on billionaire koch brothers. >>> but first, new surveillance video of a deadly shooting inside a walmart. one man is dead and the shooter has not been arrested. we'll talk about it next. covert ops? double agents? spy thriller? you don't know "aarp" thanks to the aarp tek program, this guy is spying on his new grandson. aarp tek gets people better connected to technology, to better connect with each other. with social media, digital devices and apps. if you don't think "hashtag love dad" when you think aarp, then you don't know "aarp" find more surprising possib
claim it will cause discrimination based upon religion. i stopped at that until tonight. a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to the sheriff and wouldn't give in because he said i don't serve swine. >> i know you couldn't hear that, but you were there. you were live at first when he made the comment about senate bill 1062 which you have been talking a lot about this week. a lot of people thought that could create a situation that you thought was okay. in that comment, he talked about muslims and so i guess my question to you is, is it ever okay. given our country's history to throw race outer and use it. >> i was the top guy in south america and turkey and the mideast. i know a little about foreign countries. i know about racism. i'm not going to get into my family's background. he was just making some comments. i didn't tell him what to do. i got him five minutes before. governor perry was talking about me. a lot of people roasted me. why did they put it out yesterday? why not three days ago. why did they wait for the governor's decision. you can see the politics involved in this.
attest to that we don't see race, religion or sexual orientation, we see simply can you help us win ball games, produce on the field? that's why you can have a multitude of people who are black, white, poll nice, gay, whatever it may be and come together to lay for a common goal. >> us it end? -- where does it end? i'm a bears fan, so it hurts me to say -- [laughter] do you get a 5-yard penalty for an italian slur? where do we draw the line in terms of, you said it, word police in enforcing this kind of rule, you know? if you call me an irish drunk, i consider that a compliment. [laughter] bill: not at 11 a.m. you don't. >> well, you know, it's 5:00 somewhere, right? but in the african-american community if the n-word is used with another african-american, that is soon as almost complimentary, a term of endearment. so what if it's being said -- i just think you're opening up a pandora's box that will be um possible to -- impossible to regulate. bill: you make an excellent point. gotta run. martha, what's next? martha: well, the disastrous rollout of the obamacare web site, all sides have
directly in the face of our religion. one of our core values as christians, we believe, is to love your neighbor as yourself. this bill is seeking to under a guise of religious freedom, it is seeking to give people license to discriminate. that doesn't love your neighbor as yourself. >> in the meantime, more national companies are urging a veto with a deadline a few days away. at&t, delta airlines, intel, text smart and yelp joined the earliest opponents of this bill. >>> a scathing senate report accuses credit suisse of helping wealthy americans of hiding billions from the irs. it was money hidden in panty hose, secret meetings in hotel l lobbies with no paper trail. christine romans is here with answers >>> the top brass at the bank of credit suisse, they acknowledge the behavior and say they have cleaned it up. senators are furious that this went on for so long. the government, the u.s. government, didn't do more to stop it. no question. today, right now, we're getting a very good look at the lifestyles of the rich and greedy. the numbers are shocking. according to the senate investi
is going to cause discrimination based upon religion in arizona. i scoffed at that until tonight. when a muslim waiter serving up here walked up to sheriff joe, wouldn't give him his dinner because he says i don't serve slime. >> reporter: he was a supporter of the immigration law in 2010. he declined to speak with cnn said the statements i maid were satirical comedy. did this roast go too far? >> it was a roast. john kavanaugh is my friend. he's not a racist. there's a double standard around here. everybody is talking about him. what about the activists and these civil rights that call mena decide and hitler. why isn't there an uproar about calling me every name in the book. why are they worried about some roast? >> yes. all right. coming up next on "new day" -- it does matter when you tell jokes. coming up next on "new day" sure it's an honor being nominated but there are no losers on oscar night. wait until you see what the stars will be going home with in those gift bags. i got to go back to hollywood. >> i'm sure they will report them on their taxes. ♪ honestly? i wanted a smart
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)